“For the gate is narrow and the road is hard that leads to life and there are few who find it.”

– Matthew 7:14 (NRSV)

TAKING THE NARROW ROAD

In business and in life, it’s the little things that make a difference. Many of us in business do what we think we should do or are asked. For some reason it doesn’t work out as well as we hoped. Inevitably it takes longer and there are a few more things to do. It is in this spot where we have to decide between quality and quantity.  Do we finish our task because time is telling us to move on or do we dig deeper to resolve those nagging feelings? This spot reminds me of a quote by Orson Welles who said, “The enemy of art is time.” It is here  that we have to decide if we are to move on or eliminate obstacles like time. Great art or great business decisions require quality not quantity. How often do we say, “I can’t do any more” and move on? It is this decision that separates greatness from just being good.

The founders of Airbnb were struggling, they were running out of money and homestays were not coming as they had planned. Everything had been thought out. The website was built and the homeowners discovered. A few customers had caught on, but gaining traction at the rate they had hoped wasn’t occurring. It was here that the founders stepped back to figure out why. They decided to step back and talk to many customers and homeowners to identify how they could get better. They stayed in people’s homes and interviewed customers. The founders manned the helped desk to find out more. What they discovered was that a traveler wants more than just a place to stay. They wanted to experience the city where they were staying. In turn the founders expanded their efforts to create a five-star experience in every stay. They made their site easier, became more accommodating to the home owner and began suggesting places to visit when you arrived at your destination. As we all know the  Airbnb business took off. They tried one more thing, they dug deeper into the customer’s needs and discovered another level. They didn’t quit – they stepped back.

“Through just a little more effort we unlock the solutions to our faith and business lives.”

Jesus implores us both in our faith and business lives to work harder, to take the narrow road. Jesus points to a path that is harder than what we want to do. Like a good coach, Jesus is telling us try just a few more things. Pressing on we discover around a turn a deeper level of understanding. Through just a little more effort we unlock the solutions to our faith and business lives. Instead of just being busy, we become successful. Jesus asks us to dig a little deeper and we find a life we desire.

“Jesus suggests we avoid becoming slaves to our to do lists and focus on what counts and worry about quality.”

For many of us, we are pressed for time. Our to do list piles up if we tarry too long on a project. We are besieged by an endless list of tasks. Jesus suggests we avoid becoming slaves to our to do lists and focus on what counts and worry about quality. Jesus wants us to trade off the trivial for the important, to avoid distractions and not stop until we find the answer that settles our souls. Many times, it is around a corner that looks steep and hard. But when we take the time and find it, life becomes revealed and we are for the moment contented. We no longer feel defeated or harried. We have climbed a long hill. To rephrase Orson Welles quote, “The great enemy of art is time.”

Blessings, until next time,
Bruce L. Hartman

“Take my yoke upon you and learn from me; for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.”

– Matthew 11:29 (NRSV)

FOLLOWING JESUS TO A NEW IDENTITY

My friend Bill, who left the corporate world to help the poor for the Catholic church in the northwest part of the United States, called me in distress. He had left a well-paying job in the corporate world for two years to help those less fortunate. Upon his return he was finding it hard to find a new job. Many interviewers didn’t understand why he left and many were put off by the fact he was sixty. He kept meeting dead ends in all his searching. Confused by doing good and then being rebuffed had created a crisis in his life. He didn’t need the job for money, he just wanted to belong again.

His self-esteem plummeted and he began to feel worthless. His searching kept leading him to disappointment.

Over the next two years, he searched for a place to work. He prayed on a regular basis. He even went away for a week to a retreat center looking for his answer. He wanted desperately to belong again. His self-esteem plummeted and he began to feel worthless. His searching kept leading him to disappointment.

We talked on a weekly basis at an appointed time and during these, I would often probe him about why a job in his old world was so important. He would reply, because it was his identity. For years he had worked hard to provide for his family and built a wonderful resume. But now he had lost that ability.

He kept waiting for Jesus to answer his prayer of finding him a job.

During these two years, Bill would still help others. In fact, he helped a group of Nuns create a shelter for pregnant women. Many days he put in many hours painting and fixing. Within this community he found acceptance. But not what he wanted, he wanted to go back to his old life. Often times I would tell him how much I admired his caring and giving efforts to others. I would relay to him that when I told his story to other people, they became amazed at his giving nature and life. For two years, this wasn’t enough for Bill. He kept searching and not finding. Eventually, he decided to become an EMT, while he waited for a new job. He kept waiting for Jesus to answer his prayer of finding him a job.

Typical of Bill, he was one of the best students. In spite of some physical limitations he was able to stay up with the younger people in his class. He began to thrive. Many times, I would get a text from him, “I can’t talk tonight, I am going out with my classmates.” I was used to this, as many of the people I help, eventually find their answer and move on to their new life. It is a very familiar process. They search and then they find their answer.

Later, in one of our final conversations, Bill relayed to me that he had prayed for an answer many times. But he kept looking in the wrong spots.

Later, in one of our final conversations, Bill relayed to me that he had prayed for an answer many times. But he kept looking in the wrong spots. The answer to what was his identity, didn’t lie in the old spot of the corporate world, but in helping make the world a better place. Jesus had been answering his prayers, he just hadn’t paid attention.

Jesus asks us to take his yoke. Jesus reminds us that he is “gentle and humble of heart,” and that his yoke is light. How many times do we all pray for something that we want, but Jesus gives us something different. A life plan that soothes our soul and gives us meaning. Many times, it is about following a new path and away from the familiar. A path of uncertainty, but on this path, we become guided by a “Gentle and humble heart.”

Bill is peaceful now and I miss our weekly calls. But I am happy that Bill is on path of giving.

Blessings, until next time,
Bruce L. Hartman

“Go out and stand on the mountain, before the Lord . . . and after the earthquake a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire; and after the fire a sound of sheer silence”

— 1 Kings 19: 11–12

HEARING THE SHEER SILENCE OF GOD

A friend of mine, Bob, was in the process of selling an important asset. The sale would be a crucial part of his future and success. Bob was determined to be a good seller. To not hide anything from the buyer and provide the buyer with a product that exceeded their expectations. Bob responded faithfully to all the buyer’s requests and went further than his lawyer or broker expected him to go. But the requests didn’t end. After each obstacle was resolved, another popped up. A meeting was scheduled between all the parties to find a clear path to resolution.

“He prayed for God to give him the wisdom to make the right decisions with his business and to help his wife.”

The day before the meeting Bob’s wife announced that the doctor had found something during her checkup that needed a radiologist’s opinion. The appointment with the radiologist was scheduled at the same time as my friend’s important meeting. His wife told him to go to the meeting and she would be okay. Bob felt besieged. How can I ignore my wife? But how can I secure our future? He prayed throughout the day. He prayed for God to give him the wisdom to make the right decisions with his business and to help his wife.  Then he went to the meeting and his wife went to the radiologist.

During the meeting, there were many questions. Tough questions. My friend answered them all honestly. At one point the broker for the buyer became unrelenting. Bob felt a spirit of resolve fall over him and became quietly serious. Normally Bob’s mannerisms were friendly and engaging, but now he became dead serious and firm. Looking firmly into the eyes of the buyer’s broker and without hesitation he stated firmly and in a quiet tone, “If there is a problem, I will pay to have it resolved. It is what I have done to this point and will continue to do.” He left the meeting wondering about his wife and at the same time about the state of this important sale.

“A wave of joy overcame him. While Bob had waited in silence, God had answered his prayers.”

At home he sat in his favorite chair and waited in silence. A short time passed and he got a call. The broker said, “It is done, you have done everything and had no more to do. The sale is going forward.” Shortly after, his wife called and stated that the radiologist had found nothing serious and she would need some minor medical attention. My friend rested. A wave of joy overcame him. While Bob had waited in silence, God had answered his prayers. No great bell was rung, no fireworks,  the quiet winds of life had brought his answer. Life was back in balance.

Blessings, until next time,
Bruce L. Hartman

“Pray then in this way: Our father in heaven, hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come. Your will be done, on earth as it is heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors. And do not lead us into temptation, But deliver us from the evil one.”

– Matthew 6:9-13

PRAYER

While I was discussing prayer with a business friend of mine, he related to me his morning practice. Each morning on his bike ride he would recite the Lord’s Prayer. Previously he had struggled with how to pray and what to pray for. He discovered the Lord’s Prayer and noted that this was Jesus’s example of prayer. So he incorporated this prayer into his bike ride and later would also say it in other quiet times of the day. Over time he felt that he was just reciting the lines and not being sincere. He began to change the words to reflect his understanding of the prayer. For instance, instead of saying “Our father in heaven,” he would replace it with “God our creator” or something similar. Or instead of saying “Give us this day our daily bread,” he would say “Feed me your words of wisdom.” This kept the prayer fresh for my friend and helped him explore his relationship with God.

The Lord’s Prayer appears two times in the Bible, first in Matthew 6:9–13 and a shorter form in Luke 11:2–4. The version in Matthew is part of the Sermon on the Mount. In Luke, Jesus uses the prayer to explain to his disciples how to pray. In both cases it contains the elements that are important in a prayer of petition. First, praising and recognizing God. Then petition. There are three petitions in the Lord’s Prayer. The first is for the substance to live a godly life, “Give us this day our daily bread.” This can mean food, spiritual guidance, or personal strength. The second is asking God to “forgive our debts,” or sins and that’s followed quickly by our taking responsibility for forgiving our neighbor’s debts or sins. The third petition is for protection. Protection from evil but also from the temptations of evil. Over time the prayer has morphed into longer forms that place further emphasis on the sovereign nature of God. For instance, many endings add something along the lines of “For yours is the kingdom, the power and the glory forever more.” The verse quoted at the top of the blog is a direct quote from the NKJV Bible.

“Jesus gives us The Lord’s Prayer as a basic prayer that will open up our prayer life.”

Many of us struggle with how, what, and when to pray. Jesus gives us The Lord’s Prayer as a basic prayer that will open up our prayer life. In the marketplace, where many are pressed for time, this prayer is easily memorized and can be said many times throughout the day. The prayer is easily adaptable to our personal circumstances. My friend learned how to say the prayer with creativity and tailor it to his day. God does not want us to just say the prayer from memory, God wants this prayer to be part of our personal relationship with him. It is okay to use the prayer as a template and expand it to fit into our own connection with God. Following the parameters of the Lord’s Prayer and remembering to say “In Jesus name I pray” at the end of every prayer were the only two things my friend needed in his prayer life.

Blessings, until next time,
Bruce L. Hartman

Do we pray by rote or from our hearts?

Are we remembering to praise God?

Are we willing to accept God’s answer?

“So I say to you, Ask, and it will be given you; search, and you will find; knock, and the door will be opened for you.”

– Luke 11:9

ASKING WITH FAITH

I remember sitting at my desk waiting for an answer. A few hours earlier, our chief accounting officer had told us that we were just hundreds of thousands of dollars from breaking our debt agreements. In effect, our $8 billion company was on the precipice of financial disaster. Six months earlier, I had been made the CFO of Foot Locker, inheriting responsibility for a company that was deeply in debt. Earlier in the day, I had called all our staff in for a meeting and asked if they could stay late that day, until we found a way to keep our company afloat. Not finding the means to do so would put the company into a cataclysmic spiral that would cost thousands their jobs and potentially result in a bankruptcy. We agreed that no one would go home until we came up with a solution.

It took hours, but finally, at 8:30 p.m. that night, our assistant treasurer and the chief accounting officer walked into my office, looking visibly relieved.

“We don’t know what you were so worried about,” they joked weakly. “We found some money in a long-forgotten utility deposit account.”

It was just enough to buy us another ninety days. But that was enough time to avoid the crisis, and we managed to use it to turn the company around. Two years later, we were praised in a Forbes magazine article for managing to make such a tremendous save.

JESUS AND ASKING

Jesus says all we have to do is ask. But there is more to it than just asking. We need to consider, Is what we are asking for the right thing? Are we willing to be patient and wait for God? Are we willing to put in the effort to search for the solution with Jesus? Jesus wants our participation. Once we ask, Jesus wants us to participate in searching for the answer, to take an active role in finding what we seek.

Often, we pray and ask for an answer. Many times, the answer doesn’t arrive on the timeline we’d like it to. Many times, the answer is different—but also better—than what we’d originally hoped for. Each time we ask for God’s help, we must be willing to work toward finding a solution by working with Jesus. This is God’s way. I remember sitting at my desk alone that evening at Foot Locker, calmly considering every possible solution. For hours, I could find no viable option. Then, seemingly out of nowhere, a solution materialized.

“Each time we ask for God’s help, we must be willing to work toward finding a solution by working with Jesus.”

At times, the answer to our prayers comes through people or circumstances, but it can also come simply from a Bible verse. So, after we ask, we need to become aware of our surroundings. We need to search alongside Jesus for the answers we seek. But we also must be patient. Once we ask for God’s help, we must be willing to wait for the answer on God’s time. If our hearts are pure and we take an active role in seeking what we want or need of God, we will receive what we’ve asked for.
Blessings, until next time,
Bruce L. HartmanCan we be patient in prayer?

Do we worry or stay calm after prayer?

How has God responded in the past?

“You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

Matthew 22:39

THE ONE CHRISTIAN ATTITUDE NEEDED TO CREATE RAVING FANS IN THE BUSINESS WORLD

A fellow business acquaintance called me recently to complain about the service he was getting from his vendors. He found that he was doing all the follow up and few deadlines were being met. As a customer he felt that he was doing all the work. This is not an uncommon comment that I hear. Lately, I have been hearing this comment more frequently. Leading me to think, “Wow, how much better would a company’s sales rise if they were great at follow up and follow through.” 

Recently I had another business associate call me to ask, “What is the most important thing I can do in running my business?” My answer to her was to create raving fans out of her customers. She wanted to know how and was wondering what steps she needed to take to do this. “It is simple”  I told her, “Treat customers the way you want to be treated.” To do this all she had to do was change her perspective from what was good for her business to satisfying the customers needs. This perspective means following up and following through!

How often do we have someone promise something and not deliver? How often do we find we are doing all the follow up? How often do receive commitments that aren’t met? Sometimes it feels like we are always pushing string up a hill.

Many businesses today over stretch their resources to generate more profits, leaving their existing customers frustrated. Some ignore their customers all together. How often are we left on hold?

Try calling your medical insurance company, but be prepared to wait many minutes to get a live person on the phone. Try your local cable company, where it may take hours to resolve an issue. Sure by under supporting the customer service staff, they improve profits in the short run. In the long run a disaster is brewing. Over time customers find a new solution or place to shop. Maybe not tomorrow, but inevitably it will happen.

Customers walk away silently. They usually don’t leave with a loud fanfare. Overtime the morning sales reports become dimmer. Businesses that truly put customer service as the number one business goal usually thrive.

Sure it means that they may have to give up some profits in the short run. Certainly there are people who will take advantage of companies. But this happens far less than we would think. Statistics tell us that 95% of customers don’t mean harm and just want to be served.

The same is true with our careers. We should strive to make raving fans out of our bosses and fellow workers. This is simple, treat all that we work with like customers. Solve their problems or needs with a positive and trustworthy attitude. Sometimes this might mean extra work. Sometimes it might mean we are taken advantage of. But generally it will mean appreciation, which will turn into support for our careers.

There are bosses and fellow employees that will take advantage of this attitude, but they generally fade away over time. Treating our bosses and fellow employees the way we want to be treated will usually pay off. We will feel better about ourselves and less stressed.

Recently, I had a supplier get upset with me because I wasn’t using his services anymore. Even though his product was superior, I opted to use a more reliable supplier, who said things like, “I will get back to you this afternoon.” And he always did! I never push him to get answers, he always pushed me. Our relationship is collaborative and his first concern is satisfying his customer. The supplier with the better product is losing business, because he is too hard to work with.

Jesus gave us two simple commandments; “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind. This is the greatest and first commandment.  And a second is like it: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.” (Matthew 22:37-39) The second request of  “loving your neighbor as yourself” is the part that creates raving fans with our customers, bosses and fellow employees.

There are plenty of great examples of companies who do this, like L.L. Bean. And individually we know the places in our own community who treat the customer first. They are the places we want to shop at or do business with.

For our businesses we service and those we work with, creating Raving Fans should be our goal and focus. Applying the Christian principle of “loving our neighbor as ourselves”  is all we need to do to create Raving Fans. We should ignore minor few who seek to take advantage of this attitude and focus on the 95% who will appreciate our efforts.

The one and most important thing we can all do to improve our businesses and work relationships, is treat everyone as we would want to be treated. Sounds simple in theory, but requires a daily commitment to follow this simple rule.

Blessings, until next time,
Bruce L. Hartman

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“But let it be the hidden person of the heart, with the imperishable quality of a gentle and quiet spirit, which is precious in the sight of God.”

1 Peter 3:4

ANDREW, THE UNSUSPECTING ANGEL

On December 1st 1955, a bus driver named James Blake asked Rosa Parks to give up her seat in the “colored”  section of the bus. The “white” section was filled up. Rosa refused and set off the Montgomery, Alabama bus crisis. The crisis that catapulted Martin Luther King’s career and the public start of the civil rights movement in America.

Rosa was tired of the rules that had infected her community and her. She was tired of the oppressive commands of a society that felt because of the color of her skin she was inferior. Though a quiet and peaceful woman, this moment was her “enough.” In regards to this moment Rosa explained her action as follows; “I felt the Lord would give me the strength to endure whatever I had to face. God did away with all my fear…It was time for someone to stand up–or, in my case, sit down. I refused to move.”

For her actions she was arrested. Later she was fired from her job as a seamstress and endured death threats. Life became very hard for Rosa.

What a lot of people don’t know was that Rosa was the Secretary of local branch of the NAACP. Later she would move to Detroit and briefly resumed her career as a seamstress, which she left to become the secretary of John Conyers, a member of the House of Representatives.

Rosa continued her career of quiet activism with the Black Power movement and was an advocate for political prisoners. Throughout her life she continued to quietly push back against racism and inequality.

The Montgomery bus company had to endure a long period of passenger decline due to this incident. All of the local black population refused to ride the buses and many white folks joined in as well. For one year, people would ride share or walk long distances to work. The bus company only survived when they agreed to a Supreme Court order to change their rules.

Martin Luther King became a national figure from this incident. His calm and intellectual approach captured national interest. He preached non-violence in resisting the oppressive life circumstances of the black community. He himself was arrested numerous times for protesting unfair treatment. Later he won the Nobel Peace prize and became a national figure. His fame grew to the point that two presidents, Kennedy and Johnson, would take his calls. He was a significant catalyst for the Civil Rights bill passed in 1964.

Rosa spent her life quietly helping others. It was until much later that she was recognized for her bravery. She was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal. After her death, a statue of her was built and now stands in the National Statuary Hall.

Upon her death in 2005 she became the first woman to lie in honor in the Capital Rotunda. Congress later would call her the “first lady of Civil Rights.”

It would have been nice if in the moment she created the events that started Montgomery Bus crisis, if people and our nation had supported her refusal. But life isn’t like this. Her act of bravery created a personal crisis for her, but never defeated Rosa.

We can only imagine what each of us would have done in the same moment. This story had a positive outcome, initially at the expense of a quiet and polite woman. A woman who had long watched her community suffer when they resisted incredibly unfair practices. A woman who knew her life would be in jeopardy. A woman who stood up when she had enough. Her only ally in that moment was her faith in God. A faith that stood with her for the balance of her life.

Rosa lived with a quiet strength. When she wrote the book of her life story, her publishers suggested the title “Quiet Strength.”  A book that details the life of a remarkably strong woman who knew through God it was time to stand up. Rosa wasn’t looking for the fame that followed, she just wanted the rules to be clear and fair. Her only aim. She has become in our national history, a Christian heroine.

Blessings, until next time,
Bruce L. Hartman

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“Then an angel from heaven appeared to him and gave him strength.”

Luke 22:43

ANDREW, THE UNSUSPECTING ANGEL

A friend of mine related to me a story about a time in his life when he felt all alone and that he was not a likeable person. He felt that he didn’t measure up and wasn’t worthy enough to be friends with those he met.

He had turned to God and prayed that he could become a likeable person. He prayed that others would see value in who he was and who he could become. He desired to be accepted in a world that he saw was unaccepting.

He wasn’t sure why over the past few days he hadn’t received much validation in his humanness. But wanted to be better received. He committed to God that he would try to be happier and be open to others. He committed to God he would try to hear other people’s story and not impulsively tell his life story. He just wanted to be liked.

He prayed over and over for answers to his dilemma. He prayed daily for an answer.

One day after a long day of activity, he found a bench surrounded by other benches that were full of people. He looked around and was sure no one would want to talk with him. Sure he didn’t measure up. He still sat on one of the open benches.

A friendly man looking for a rest sat down next to him and immediately said, “Hi, I am Andrew.” Immediately, my friend went to the deep recesses of his mind and rehashed all that he promised in his prayers. He wouldn’t blurt out his life story, but try to discover who this person was. He remembered to be friendly and open. He remembered he had promised God he would treat people with openness and positive thoughts.

My friend replied, “My name is Jack, where are you from?” Immediately Andrew responded and began to regale Jack with story after story about his life. Jack propelled Andrew along with questions and positive affirmation. Never really telling Andrew anything about himself, but searching for who this new person was.

He sat and listened to a life well lived. A life that included raising three children. Andrew told him about his career and his complicated life story. Andrew told him about what a wonderful woman he had married. Andrew told him about how he loved life.

In Andrew telling his life story, Jack discovered a person, who always received favors. Doors were always opened in his life because he was inviting and kind. He had been a great salesperson, because he didn’t sell for the sake of selling, but because he liked helping. Out of Andrew came a life well lived and a happy soul.

After sometime had passed, two of Andrew’s friends showed up. The bench was their meeting point late that afternoon. Andrew introduced my friend to these two new people, by saying, “This is Jack, he is an extraordinary person.” My friend was stunned and wondered what had he done to be called an extraordinary person. He had just sat and listened. Revealing little about his life and only had shown intense interest in the value of his new friend, Andrew.

The four of them sat and talked for another hour. My friend listened and learned about two new people. People who had also lived good lives. People who went to college, raised families and were successful.

When it was time for all to depart, my friend said it was nice to meet these new people and wished them well. They did likewise.

After this, Jack reflected on the events and connected them to his prayers. He was worthy of being liked. He was worthy enough that three people could like him. He hadn’t done much but shown he cared about their lives. He had mostly sat and listened. Most of time he spent was smiling and probing for more. Just as he had promised God he would do in his prayers. He was validated.

Jack knew why Andrew had shown up. Andrew was an unsuspecting angel sent to prove to Jack that he was okay. Sent to Jack, so Jack could try out a new way of being a friend. A way that only included being open, positive and listening.

Andrew will never know that he helped God that day or perhaps he did. But he did help another human regain a sense of connectedness and to try out a new way to be a friend.

Jesus’ approach to those he met was similar. He never judged, he met people as they were. He learned life stories, he heard people’s fears and joys. Even if they were nefarious tax collectors or prostitutes. Jesus searched for their humanity.Jesus listened to the stories of the “stray cats” of life and cared. He listened to the rich, the poor, the disenfranchised and all that humanity could bring. Jesus was open to all and many were open to Jesus.

In every person there is a wonderful story, we only have to ask and listen. Jack learned his goal in life wasn’t to be liked, but to like. He wasn’t to judge, but hear.

God had answered Jack’s prayer, not the way he expected. But in a far richer way. In moments of desperation Jack had prayed. His prayers had been answered through an unsuspecting angel. Answers that were far better than what he prayed for.

Blessings, until next time,
Bruce L. Hartman

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Blessed Assurance

Blessèd assurance, Jesus is mine!
O what a foretaste of glory divine!
Heir of salvation, purchase of God,
Born of His Spirit, washed in His blood.

This is my story, this is my song,
Praising my Savior, all the day long;
This is my story, this is my song,
Praising my Savior, all the day long.

FANNY CROSBY, A BLIND SERVANT OF GOD

The song Blessed Assurance is one of the most popular songs in  Christian Hymnals. Written in 1873 and first sung in churches the same year. The hymn was inspired by the life of the Apostle Paul and his steady faith and his work. The hymn was written by Fanny Crosby, the world’s most published hymn writer and who was blind.

Shortly after birth, Fanny caught a cold that settled in her eyes. Her parents took her to a doctor, who applied a mustard base ointment. It did not cure the affliction, but damaged Fanny’s optic nerve, leaving her blind. Later the doctor was discovered to be a quack and was banished from practicing medicine.

However, her blindness did not leave her helpless. She went on to become the most prolific hymn writer in America and the world. She wrote over 9,000 hymns. The most famous being “Blessed Assurance.”

She lived from 1820 to 1915. From the age of 23 to her death, she knew and spoke with every American president. She spoke in front of congress numerous times, urging for the support of the blind. In fact, she became the first woman to speak in front of the U.S. Senate, at the age of 23.

Crosby wrote over 9,000 hymns during her lifetime. Her publishers paid her $1 to $2 a song. While her publishers only requested 3 to 4 songs a week, Fanny wrote 6 or 7 a day. She was so prolific some denominations asked her to use a pseudo name, to ensure their hymnals didn’t appear to be written by one composer.

Fanny’s songs are in every denominations hymnal’s. While a life-long member of the 6th Avenue Bible Baptist church in Brooklyn, she also attended many different denominations. Believing she was a Christian first and not denominationally directed.

When Fanny began any hymn composition, she prayed for direction. She was also inspired by people she met during her day. For example, she came across a prisoner being sent to jail and heard him say, “O Lord, don’t pass me by.” This meeting created the song, Pass me not, O gentle Savior.

Today, Fanny isn’t a household name, but in her day she was one of the America’s most influential people. She openly communicated with presidents and members of Congress.

Many times people expressed sympathy for her blindness. Her response was, “Do you know that if at birth I had been able to make one petition, it would have been that I was born blind?” When asked why she would say this her reply was, “Because when I get to heaven, the first face that shall ever gladden my sight will be that of my Savior.”

Fanny memorized the entire Bible. As a child she learned five chapters a week. As a child she could recite, Proverbs, the Psalms and the entire Gospel. Every day of every week, she made the study of the Bible her goal.

As an adult she taught at the New York Institute for the Blind. She spent 11 years teaching, only to leave to pursue her writing career. But remained a lifelong benefactor of the school.

Fanny died in 1915 at the age of 95. She left a legacy of Christian commitment and service. “You will reach the river brink, some sweet day, bye and bye,” was her last written stanza.

Blessings, until next time,
Bruce L. Hartman

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“And those who know your name put their trust in you, for you, O Lord, have not forsaken those who seek you.”

Psalm 9:10

THREE VITAL CHARACTERISTICS OF A GREAT BUSINESS PERSON

During my business career as a CFO in organizations such as, Footlocker and Yankee Candle, we seldom used resumes to identify great employees. Instead we used three other determinants to decide who was going to be hired or promoted. We looked for people that were positive, trustworthy and desired competence in their work. Sure it is an unorthodox and counter intuitive approach, but it worked. We put people in jobs that didn’t indicate they could do the job, frequently. We relied exclusively on these three traits. In the end it always worked out. There is also a fourth component to our success and it is relying on God, especially in tough times. Faithful people know how to  maintain these skills during moments of stress. During tough times these people worked with God to gain insight and to steady themselves.

Always Maintain a Positive Attitude

People migrate to others who are upbeat, energetic and happy. These are the people that always seem to have things go their way. These people can make otherwise resistant people want to help. They get things done because their paths are clear and straight. Drama is what they avoid and camaraderie is what they seek. Maintaining a positive attitude opens more doors than grumbling.

Be Trustworthy in Everything

Trustworthy people are the ones we turn to when we have a difficult problem. They are trustworthy in everything; their conversations, work and social interactions. When they say they can do something, we know they will. They don’t let momentary obstacles delay their tasks. They figure out how to meet their commitments. These people treasure being honest and always provide clear facts despite being in a difficult situation. Every conversation with these people leaves us assured we have the facts and answers.

Desire to be Competent in Everything

Competence isn’t created because we are good talkers, but good doers. There may be times we don’t know the technical aspects of our jobs; great employees seek to understand how to improve and spend their days listening to learn. They thirst for knowledge and are careful with ill-informed opinions. While these people may be slow at first, their unquenchable desire to be the best raises them up over time. Competency does come on a resume, but comes through learning and listening openly to others.

Learn to Rely on God

While all these traits are easy to do when things are running smoothly, it is much harder in times of duress. During difficult times it is hard to stay upbeat. When confronted with difficult tasks it is hard to stay assured and confident. It can be hard when pressed to give a different answer then what the facts say. But we have one resource available to help us through the times. Prayers and a close relationship with God will certainly buoy us during these storms. Adhering to the values of God in our responses to duress we protect us and tell us what path to follow. Through God we will receive the right answers to life’s difficult times to help us stay positive, trustworthy and competent.

Why not try these four values out today and don’t forget to pray for guidance.

Blessings, until next time,
Bruce L. Hartman

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